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about going to tijuana it occurred to me that immigration in europe was not really developing along the same lines that the american one was spirited it was much more disruptive. it was much more full of problems for the society. it which much more traumatic for the people that live there. i started reporting on that fourth the atlantic monthly. i wound up making dozens of trips and became -- it became a very natural thing for me to read a book about. >> use a we have about 35 milligan people in the united states that were born in other countries. -- you say that we have about 35 million people in the united states that were born in other countries. >> this book is really about western europe the 15 western european countries that constitute the core of the european union. they have a population just under 400 million. there are about 50 million people living outside their country of birth in those countries. they are not from outside of europe, but a significant portion of them are. a significant portion of the non-european immigrants are from muslim lands. there are now about 20 m
that immigration in europe was not really developing along the same lines as the american one was. it was much more disruptive. there were more problems for the society. it was much more traumatic for the people who live there. i started reporting on that. at first, for the atlantic monthly. that was in the late 1990's. when september 11 happened, there was a lot of interest in these communities and how well they were assimilated and what their ideas were and what the europeans were doing about them and i wound up making dozens and dozens of trips. >> you said that we have about 35 million people who were born in other countries to live in the united states. in europe, what is the population? here, here it is 207 million. >> it is now the e.u. 25. the 50 states make up the union. -- the 15 states that make up the core of the european union. they have a population of about 400 million. there are about 50 million people living outside their country of birth. they are not all from outside of europe. a significant portion of them are. a significant proportion of the non european immigrants are now abou
caldwell talks about the immigrant experience in europe. and later, a debate on the legacy of former british prime minister, winston church i will. . .63ñ >> i began to write about it in 1989. i covered the twcoup panama. i was interested in this. then, the berlin wall came down. the cold war ended. they were totally and interested in sending and journalists to latin america to cover anything, but i kept this interest in latin american culture. i covered immigration in the united states. i love the topic of immigration. midway through the 1990's, when i was thinking of going to tijuana to write a book on tijuana, it occurred to me that immigration in europe was not really developing along the same lines as the american one was. it was much more disruptive. there were more problems for the society. it was much more traumatic for the people who live there. i started reporting on that. at first, for the atlantic monthly. that was in the late 1990's. when september 11 happened, there was a lot of interest in these communities and how well they were assimilated and what their i
of western europe spent a lot of time attacking coca-cola and they used that as a symbol of america so when khrushchev seems to enjoy pepsi cola the kremlinists thought it was a significant event. obviously, you don't think it's that significant but it's another example how the two countries didn't understand each other and tried to fumble to try to get clues. >> it is just different cultures. it's just what happened. and of course we're running out of time. but i want to say and ask you what you would recommend. khrushchev never went to disneyland and i also never went to disneyland because i don't want to -- how to say the mythology of disneyland that you never can go in. khrushchev never shouted i'm better than you in the united nations and i'm better from you it was the khrushchev in the 19th century that capitalist will bury. but he said this word three years before. it was no love affair with marilyn monroe. my neighbor told that khrushchev flew secretly every week to florida to meet with her. >> your neighbor said that. your neighbor in america? >> in america. they hear this story in
as shorure that the order that settled in europe, the oversight order, was the first, although short-lived attempt to construct peace on our continent and in the world. the treaty of versailles and at open the route to independence -- had opened the route to independence to poland, hungary, finland, czechoslovakia, and in yugoslavia and, and within yugoslavia, slovenia, croatia -- this treaty accounted for the sovereignty of nations and the protection of minorities. it turned out to be ephemeral for several reasons, but not least for the reason and took -- that totalitarian systems emerged. and the brink to occurrence was the emergence the third reich. it led by an aggressive ideology and, an ideology of revenge, and nazism questioned the whole heritage of european civilization. during the years 1933-1938, this system was a party to attempted treaties fostered by afrance and great britain. already in the 1930's, poland proposed a pre-emptive strike, and this proposal was not taken up. therefore: i nonaggression treaty with german just as it had a similar treatment wit -- a similar tr
the face of europe and the lessons there for the united states. the journal editorial report starts right now! captioned by closed captioning services, inc. >> paul: women come, i'm paul gigot. after angry town halls and slipping poll numbers democrats and the president return to washington next week hoping to salvage what they can of a faultering domestic agenda. top priority health care reform. debate the president hopes to refrain -- reframe wednesday night k he make an awe dumb comeback? joining us opinion journal.com columnist, and washington columnist. kim, are we going to see a big different change of strategy tort autumn comeback or not? >> the white house is realizing it does not have the support it needs. but it also understands that it would be deadly to not have some for the of it health care legislation having campaigned and worked on this for sole. giving this address to congress you are going to see a lot of town halls and a push publicly. also groundwork being laid where they can step back a little. talking about maybe working with republicans for a smaller bill something
build europe which was worth you -- we shall build a europe which was worth your great sacrifice. thank you. [applause] >> will all please rise. what is now here the role of honor. -- let us now here the rolar thf honor. >> we gather here on westerplatte on the 70th anniversary of the outbreak of the second world war, the most terrible of the cataclysms' of the 20th century, paying tribute to all its victims. maybe it remembered forever. -- mayday be remembered forever. -- may they be remembered forever. ♪ >> now i would like to ask the prime minister of poland, francois fillon, to take the floor. -- the prime minister of poland, donald tusk, to take the floor. >> why? why here? why now on the first of september in gdansk? and not in some places -- and not in some other place that the leaders of europe have gathered? why in gdansk, and why on the first of september? why do we see here leaders of poland from the previous year s? why here in gdansk on the first of september, veterans are meeting together with young people? it wasn't gdas -- it was in gdansk on the first of september tha
here around the world to the far east, europe, and back to the united states. the markets fell. today, the bankers of wall street have largely recovered their nerve. they are taking risks again. this year, many will be rewarded with handsome bonuses. have we really learned the lessons of lehman brothers? the answer to that is important to future prosperity. >> our business correspondent is also in new york. how is this being received? >> i think we have heard from some on wall street who say they do not want to see more government involvement in the market. one player on wall street was telling us they were worried the government would make a mess of things. that is not surprising given some of the banks that survived and those that were forced to take money from the taxpayers who have already repaid it. they may feel that their business model works fine and they should not be subject to more regulation. the president has tried to point out in his speech that they have all benefited as a result of the american taxpayer and therefore owe it to the american people. -- the 0 ed debt to t
for europe. we look at what is behind the decision. >>> the war in afghanistan turns deadly for italian troops. six are killed in a suicide bombing in kabul. while in pakistan, school has reopened in a former battle zone. >>> we return to zimbabwe where a new political era has brought change and something lacking for so long -- hope. >>> and our signature series, preserving history, our man in rome shows us how building a subway is a delicate journey through ancient treasures. >> from the world's leading reporters and analysts, here's what's happening from around the world. this is "worldfocus." made possible in part by the following funders -- major support has also been provided by the peter g. peterson foundation, dedicated to promoting fiscal responsibility and addressing key economic challenges facing america's future. >>> good evening. i'm daljit dhaliwal. when barack obama came to office, he inherited a controversial plan from president bush for a missile defense system in europe to be based in the czech republic and poland. the idea was to counter a perceived threat to europe po
. this is not a stretch. we can move forward to places like europe. in 2018, we expect to see the next iteration. that is further out. we are looking for the emergence of the sm-3 block two. it will be a larger missile that will deploy on our ships and on shore. that missile will allow us in probably no more than three locations to be able to cover the entire land mass of europe. this is against intermediate and short-range ballistic missiles. that is a substantial improvement on where we are. at the same time, we're continuing the effort we have ongoing today on the ground- based interceptor which is to build a two-stage capability. the tests are funded and will continue. we will have two ways to address this threat. we believe the leverage will be in the sm-3, that it will be the more effective killer. until we know that, we are not abandoning the work we are doing on the ground-based interceptors. the last piece of this and this is reaching out for into the future, 200020, is a land based sm-3, blocked two,a and now b . this will have a substantial capability to intercept intercontinental bal
there. plus, how muslim immigration changed the face of europe. can the left there from the united states. the journal editorial report starts right now. welcome to the journal, editorial report. after a brutal august recess angry town halls and slipping pole numbers, democrats and president obama return to washington next week and honing to salvage what they can of a faltering agenda. the topic, health care reform. the president hopes to reframe when he addresses a joint session of congress on wednesday night. can he make an autumn comeback, joining us the panel this week, thewallwa wall street journal columnist and washington columnist, well, kim, are we going to see a big different change of strategy for the auto comeback or not? >> you know what, this white house is realizing it does not have the support it needs for big grand health care ambitions, but understands it would be deadly to not have some sort of health care legislation, having campaigned and worked on this for so long. so you're still going to see, you'll be giving this address to congress, you're going to see a lo
the smell test. >> those to say we're scud missile defense in europe are either misinformed or misrepresenting the reality of what we're doing. >> our missile defense changes, is it an improvement in security or a gift to the russians? former president jimmy carter has a theory about some of president obama credit." . >> i believe he should not be president because he happens to be african-american. ♪ captioned by the national captioning institute --www.ncicap.org-- ♪ >> welcome to "inside washington co yes? -- i am margaret carlson. gordon peterson is on vacation. the federal reserve chief says the recession is probably over. a year after the failure of lehman brothers, president obama traveled to wall street to talk about preventing a repeat of the economic meltdown. >> the only way to avoid a crisis of this magnitude is to ensure that large firms cannot take risks that threaten our entire financial system. and to make sure that we have the resources to weather even the worst of economic storms. >> said the president is saying some in the financial industry have not le
of staff to restructure the plan for missile defense in europe. president obama put it this way, "our new missile defense architecture in europe will provide stronger, smarter and swifter defenses of american forces and american allies". secretary gates called the new approach" vastly more suitble and and a far more effective defense than a previous plan to deploy 10 long-range interceptors in poland and a radar in the czech republic." i believe this decision will enhance our national security and the security of our allies and partners in the region. it will deploy demonstrated technology sooner to defend against the number one existing threat in the middle east. the threat of iranian short and medium range missiles. they can reach our forward-deployed forces and allies in europe and israel. secretary gates has said the existing iranian threat "was not addressed" by the prove youts -- previous plan. the new european missile defense architecture will evolve and increase in capability as iran's missile capabilities evolve. it is flexible and adaptable to circumstances. it will counter futu
. and churchill in fact delayed the invasion of northern europe for the wrong reasons. he wanted to attack italy and then advance northeastward into central europe to preempt the red army's occupation. this was militarily unsound. but it shows his determination to save central europe, something which did not concern the americans. and they saw this as an example of churchill playing politician for the post-war period. they could not have been more wrong in underestimating the soviet intention to impose a huge corridor across eastern and central europe. the point was churchill was proved right-to-delayed the invasion, whether or not it was for the wrong robes. and now, the whole allied strategy of the second world war had been determined at the conference in november 1943. stalin within the driving seat partly because of the successes of the red army that year and partly because he would claim that the ove yet union was fighting the bulk of varment and suffering casualties. roosevelt attempting to curry favor with stalin was cutting himself loose with his alliance with churchill. he was even agre
break out in central france in late july 1944. churchill delayed the invasion of northern europe for the wrong reasons. he wanted to attack an advance northeast into central europe to prevent the red army's occupation. this is militarily unsound, i will certainly admit. it shows his determination to save central europe, something which did not concern the americans. they saw this as an example of churchill playing politics. they could not have been more wrong and underestimating the intention to impose an accord on a across central and eastern europe. the point is that he was proved right, whether or not it was for the wrong reasons. ahold allied strategy had been determined at the conference in 1943. stalin was in the driver's seat, partly because he claimed that the soviet union was suffering the bulk of the casualties. roosevelt, and an attempt to curry favor, was cutting himself loose from his close alliance with churchill. he was agreeing on matters with stolen behind churchill's back and making jokes about the british attempt to hold on to the empire. it was roosevelt who p
, will they stay or go? could ireland possibly vote in favor of closer ties with europe? it's the least struggle against illegal immigration is intensifying. authorities are determined to stem the flow of people trying to get through into its borders. year after year more and more africans risk their lives by boarding rickety boats into europe. many migrants that make it there, italy is far from the promised land that they expected. >> back breaking work, picking tomatoes, and for each small crate they get paid $5. on a good day they might make $50. not exactly the life they imagined. >> we just did not know italy was like this. we thought it was a country where you could find a job. but it is not like that. >> living conditions are appalling. shacks have been thrown together with bits of wood and plastic. the medical charity doctors without borders is deeply concerned about their health and welfare. >> they sleep on the ground on mattresses that they got in the street. most of them are rotten. infested with insects. >> work is thin on the ground. food is scarce. as soon as one harvest is over,
-- >> republicans snub the baucus plan -- democrats, too. >> thosewho say we are dismantling missile dense in europe are misinrmed or misrepresenting reality. >> former esident jimmy carter hasa eory about some of president obama's crits. >> police tt he should not be present becae he happens-- they bieve that he should not be present becau he happens to be african-amerin. "tibrant's college football previ captioned by the national captioning initute --www.icap.org-- >> welcome to "iide washingt" am margaret carlson. gord peterson is on vacation. federal reservchief ben bernanke says that the recession is probably over esident obamatraveled to wall street to talk about preveing a peat of the economic meltdown. >> thenly way to avoid a crisis of this magnitude is to be ensure thatarge firms caot take risks that threaten our entir financial system, and to make sure they have the resources to weather t wor econom storms. >>he president is ying that some the financial dustry aregnoring the ssons of the financial crisi how did wall street respond to this sermonette, charles? >> with a bit of shrug the
and our military assets in europe, but when it comes right down to it, people want to know when is the united states the safest, and that system would have been available sooner and would have provided the greatest coverage. now, you don't have to take my word for it. our committee had asked for an independent assessment of this whole thing. the super defense analysis, this is the declassified portion of the report, gave an independent assessment of the proposed deployment of ballistic missile defense systems in europe. i have asked from the secretary of defense to release the full classified version of this text and it compares what you just asked me and it concluded that the system that was just scrapped was the one that was most cost effective and provided the best courage to the united states. it compared all of the systems that they're now proposing, because this was done with an anticipation that maybe, maybe the other system would work better. i don't know if you've read this but this says the system that was scrapped -- >> they generally don't like to give classified rep
and stability enjoyed by europe for many decades. no contributions are too often taken for granted. it is remarkable that nato is involved in combat 3,000 miles from europe. we should also celebrate the fact that nato membership has been mr. -- a tremendous engine of reform among prospective members, helping them to achieve the institutional structures needed for success in the 21st century. and like the perennial debate on capitol hill concerning the size and direction of our foreign assistance budget, sweeping reforms undertaken by nadab are in large extent self driven and self funded, constituting of foreign policy bargain for nato governments. the concept for more prosperous countries has been an indispensable element of european stability during the last two decades. we must not repeat the folly of the early days of the cold war when the appearance of rigid u.s.-drawn printer invited the perception that we would defend any thing beyond that line. we must help the baltic region. to abide wait a, i start with the resumption that after 60 years, it is still a work in progress. al
, but it provided both europe and the united states with short, medium, intermediate, and long range -- the most important aspect would be a long range -- icbm potential. if iran should missile, if that system could go on line as early as 2013, the schedule deployment time, and there was some concern as to whether that would be the appropriate configuration. other systems that could in a different configuration could make a difference. an independent assessment that our subcommittee just present, showed that this was but -- the most cost-effective system of all the other systems that we have in place or in place. this would have been the most cost-effective. the other aspect this time. again, the system having been slated for availability as early as 2013, the white house in their own communication indicates that their plan, which is currently an undefined plan as to what it would put in place, will not be available until 2020. so sitting here in 2009, having the president of the united states choosing a different plan available in 2010 for a thread that i think that is imminent, and scrap the p
morning, everybody. , he said the change of tactic better protect america and europe. >> the best way to advance our security is deploying a missile defense system that best response to the threats that we face and utilizes technology that is proven and cost- effective. >> the old plan was to base missiles at this air base in poland along with a radar system in the czech republic. the russians were furious and fall plan was to turn the base into a forward base that threatened them. they threaten to move missiles to the very borders of eastern europe. the defense secretary from the bush administration at first recommended the original plan. now he's changed his plan -- his mind. >> i believe this provides a better capability for our forces in europe, for our european allies, and for our homeland than the program i recommended three years ago. >> the pentagon says things have changed since then. iranians are not developing a long-range missiles that could hit the united states as quickly, but they are investing in shorter range misses barry denied the state has developed technology that
and central europe, in violation of the solemn pledges he gave in the atlantic charter. when he came back from yalta in 1945, he told parliament, i know of no government that stands to its occupations were solidly than the russian and soviet government. he then gave his benediction to the most barbaric act of ethnic cleansing in history, a forced expulsion of 13 million german old men, women, and children from their ancestral homes in eastern and central europe. 2 million died in the exodus. germany was a smoldering ruin, with all the capitals of central and eastern europe, warsaw, berlin, budapest, prague, vienna, occupied by stalin's red army. britain was bankrupt and broken. the americans were going home, but there was this constellation, highly selassie was back on his throne. in churchill entered the inner cabinet, britain was the first nation on earth and ruler of the greatest empire syndrome. when he left in 1945, britain was an island dependency of the united states. he was a great man, at the cost of his country's greatness. thank you. [applause] >> andrew roberts spent 20 years resea
german old men and women and children from their ancestral homes in eastern and central europe. 2 million. two million died. and all of the great capitals of central and eastern europe, warsaw and prague and vina were occupy by -- occupied by stalin's red army. britain was broken, the empire collapsing and the americans were going home but this was there consolation, and haley was back on his thrown. and when churchill entered the inner cabinet, britain was the first nation on earth and ruler of the greatest empire since roam. when he left in 1945, britain was an island dependency of the united states. he was a great man at the cost to his country's greatness. thank you. >> andrew roberts, historian and writer who spent 20 years researching churchal and the second world war. his first book was a by greaf of lord halifax, churchill's foreign secretary. and among other books, "secrets of leadership" "masses and commanders" and" the storm of war." and andrew roberts. [applause] >> winston churchill was not just an asset to the free world, he was its champion. he was the champion on five majo
" president obama pulls the plug on a ground based missile defense shield for europe. we'll tell you his reasons and get reaction. we'll also look at the politics of the deal and reports that iran may already have the ability to build a nuclear bomb. we'll examine the fortunes of the latest healthcare reform bill and tell you why house speaker nancy pell pelosi got emotional about the subject today and show you why the community group acorn is hemorrhaging money and support. all that, plus the fox all-stars, right here, right now. welcome to washington. i'm bret baier. president obama is taking heavy fire tonight for a decision to abandon plans for a missile defense system based in eastern europe. we have fox team coverage tonight. national security correspondent jen jennifer griffin reports that the president is pursuing a different strategy which he and his aides say will be a better fit. >> this is what the pentagon says the obama administration's new missile defense system will look like -- ship-based, mobile and a lot cheaper than the ground-based system planned for poland and the c
. above-trend growth seen in europe now. the next place, believe it or not, is the u.s. the u.s. for the rest of this year is going to look much more like a normal recovery. >> i want to talk about the u.s. first i've got to get your take on europe here. because we did see positive gdp readings in both france and germany. >> right. >> a lot of people have come on the show and they're questioning how sustainable that really is. when you were on the ground in europe, when you were on the ground in france and germany, do you really feel like things have turned? >> i think you're making a very good point in that we're seeing the events now, a lot of it's inventory. they had a big auto sales push from some fiscal initiatives. but you're probably right, one, you've got a strong currency there. you haven't had as much policy stimulus. so i think, not only that, but countries like the uk, like tightening next year. so i think you're probably right, it's not going to stay as strong. >> in europe? >> in europe. but the place you're going to see it is the u.s. >> there's something about
remains important and look at a division of labor with europe and what countries like gulf countries and japan can do to contribute as part of a global alliance. >> i had another question, but i'm out of time. thank you very much. >> thank you, senator casey, senator wicker. >> thank you, senator lugar. i want to get back to one of the many excellent points of senator lugar, that he mentioned during his extensive question and ask about the election. now, today is the 17th. we're supposed to hear some definitive results. i'm told the afghan central election commission has released the result showing that president karzai has received 54.62% of the vote. now, the international committee is still waiting for the independent election commission to make its assessment. senator lugar raised the possibility that as many as one-third of president karzai's votes might be invalid. i wonder if any of you can tell me when we can expect to hear something from the independent election commission. in listening to the administration, that there's also a resignation that president karzai is going to
is trying to meet the challenge head on. it wants to allow more refugees to enter europe illegally and for the resettlement to be distributed more equally among the 27 member states. at present, most make landfall in the countries like italy and spain. europe does not have a good record in taking its share of the global refugee burden. less than 7% of all refugees settled around the world last year. >> at the moment, 10 out of 27 have resettlement programs. we hope things will change. >> the problem is only expected to get worse. continuing violence in iraq, afghanistan, and pakistan have created millions of refugees. many camping out in other countries waiting for resettlement. the afghan war is far from over and its full impact is expected to be felt for years to come. >and there is no end in sight fr african poverty and violence. many make the long journey north. like millions around the world, they believe their own governments have failed them. they hope for a safer life in europe. >> a senior british government minister said he told libya that prime minister gordon brown did
>>> tonight on "worldfus" -- >> president obam rerses call for the missildefense systems to europe. weook at what is behind the decision. >>> the war in afghanian turns deadly for italian trps. six are kied in a suicide bombing in kabul. e in pakistan, schools have reened in a former battle ne. >>> we retur to zimbabwe where a ne political era has brght chan and something lacking for so long pe. . >>and our signature series, preservi history, our man in rome shows us how building a subway ia delicate journey through ancient treares. >> frothe world's leading reporters and analyst, he's at's happening from around t world. th is "worldfocus." ma possible in part by the following funders -- majosupport has also been provided by the peter g. peterson fouation, dedicated to promoting fiscal sponsibility and addressing key economic challenges faci america's futu. >>> good eveng. i'm daljithaliwal. en barack obama came to office,he inherited a coroversial plan from president bush for aissile fense system in euro to be based in the czech r poland. theidea was to counter a perceived threa t
europe illegally, but it is a sensitive issue and a controversial idea. >> it is an ambitious scheme that may take years to unfold fully, but as boat load after boatload of people tried to escape the developing world, the european union is trying to meet the challenge head on. it wants to allow more refugees to enter europe legally and for their resettlement to be distributed more evenly among the 27-member states. the president must make landfall in the southern countries. and europe does not have a good record in taking its share of the global refugee burden. they now have less than 7% of refugees settled on a world last year. >> it is true that for the moment, 10 out of 27 eu countries have resettlement programs, so we help with the resettlement scheme and with the resettlement of more iraqi refugees, things will be changed. >> the problem is only expected to get worse. continuing violence in iraq, afghanistan, and pakistan have created millions of refugees, many camping out in other countries reaching for resettlement -- waiting for resettlement. the conflict is far from over, an
of the interesting things is the difference between europe and the u.s. in total, the write-offs have come to $1.3 trillion. they still expect $1.7 trillion to be written off. a lot of that writing off. >> when they give these figures, there global figures. is there a difference between what is happening in america and europe? >> yes, and also looking at japan. japan has not have much problem. europe still has a lot of problems, which they feel are not for a nice sentiment. more with the continental bank's then the eastern banks. with the continental banks, they have exposure to europe. those who think it's still has to come to the whole system. as we reach the next reporting system and we have the banks reporting on the last quarter, we have seen remarkable recovery so far. whether that recovery will continue -- that is a different matter altogether. it may not continue. >> you will be looking at all this in the business report in 25 minutes. thank you very much. let's look at some other news stories. the military government in guinea has announced an indefinite ban on what it calls somerset ga
, barack obama abandons plans for a missile defense system in eastern europe meant to repel iran. why has it done it and what does it mean for american defense and diplomacy? six italian soldiers and 10 civilians dead and a suicide pact koppel. militants allegedly behind many attacks killed in a police raid. also, turn the page in the marketing -- but will losing adverts takeoff. actor michael caine on the warpath in the streets of south london in his latest role as a vigilante pensioner. it is midday in london, 3:00 p.m. in moscow and 7:00 a.m. in washington where barack obama will abandon plans to install a missile defense system in poland and the czech republic to repel potential attacks from iran. according to "the wall street journal " " the decision was made at the assessment of iran dr. law arrangement -- missile program was not as feared. moscow opposed it. could this harold a new chapter? first, this report. >> an iranian missile test -- fears about iran's potential for developing long-range missiles and capping them with nuclear warheads lay behind the bush administration's plan
countries. the hope is that it will discourage people from trying to reach europe illegally but it is controversial and sensitive issue. >> it is an ambitious scheme that might take years to unfold. as boatload after boatload tried to escape the developing world, the european union is trying to meet the challenge head-on. they want to allow more refugees to enter your legally and for their resettlement to be distributed more evenly between the 27 member states. they make landfall in countries like italy and spain europe does not have a good record in taking its share of the burden. -- they make landfall in countries like italy and spain. europe does not have a good record in taking its share. >> 10 of 27 has recidivism programs. we hope that the eu has a settlement scheme. we hope that things will change. >> the problem is only expected to get worse. continuing violence in iraq and afghanistan, and pakistan has created millions of refugees, many camping out in other countries waiting for resettlement. the afghan war is far from over and it's a full impact will be felt for ye
think they should be asked for civilian surge capability. there's plenty of that in europe, and if you knock down the wall between nato and e.u., you might be able to access a lot of that capability that we need there. >> well, i'd like to examine -- that's a good thought there, but i want to exam this attitude -- examine this attitude a little bit. do they know something that we don't know? >> well, i can't speak for them. in terms of what they know. >> well, but you've had these conversations. i've had these conversations, and you have too. there is an attitudinal difference about the threat. there's a threat definition difference, isn't there? >> indeed. >> but isn't that important for us to understand? >> well, i think it's been discussed here. in europe terrorism is viewed as a police issue when it's visited upon their people. and you deal with it then as opposed to stopping it before it gets into your country. so the military generally does not deal with terrorism to the extent that we do here because of the attacks. >> but i think their perception goes actually deeper than that.
will that have on relations with eastern europe? we discuss that with vaclav klaus, president of the czech republic. mr. president, thank you very spending the time with me today. >> thank you. >> what are your thoughts of the shift in terms of the missile? >> the first sentence i have to answer i was not surprised or shocked because it seems to ne rumors in the last couple of weeks and months were aiming at that decision. i believe it will not somehow damage the extremely friendly and productive relations between the czech republic and the united states. so that's the first thing we have to stress. with regards to security of central and eastern europe, i don't think it is such an important issue. for us, it was much more a symbolic gesture. we wanted simply to demonstrate our friendship with the united states. that was the main reason for our accepting the idea of the missile defense system in our country. >> i see. so do you have an understanding of what was behind the policy? >> i think it was not just policy shift. i interpret it as a shift in the technical details of the defense issu
, christine. just as the american markets seemed to follow europe and asia higher yesterday, it looks like we're going to follow them lower today. perhaps that's not a surprise that investors might want to take a bit of a breather after over the past few days, the dow has been up over 2.3%, the nasdaq has been up 3.5% in the rally and the s&p 500 has climbed 3% in that two-day period. we'll check the yield on the bund. on the benchmark 10-year t-note, the yield went down and rose to 3.46%. today we have the government coming in with yet another auction. this time, it's $20 billion of ten-year notes. we've got some federal reserve members making a couple of speeches and then, of course, the beige book coming out. that could impact what happens here. right now, the yield is sitting at 3.46%. finally, christine touched on it. we have gold yet again trading below now $1,000 an ounce. it hit a high yet of $1,007 per ounce, but settled below $ ,000, about $the 97 and change. so it is up from yesterday, but trading below that psychological threshold, if you will, of $1,000. christine, over to you. >
that may impose duties on chinese manufacturers. >>> and i'm ross westgate in europe. >> and i'm julia boorstin. s.e.c. is asking agencies to apply to a new set of rules to supply transparency. >>> hello and welcome to cnbc's "worldwide exchange." global equities a little softer today, but we've had a pretty good run of it. this is where we stand on the cnbc ftse 100, down 4,355. not as weak as what we've seen in asia. very slim losses, indeed. the ftse 100 down, indee indeed, 0.13%. the ftse has been up for five consecutive days. and up over 3.5% in the last three days. food and beverage is one of the strongest exits today along with health care. today, dollar yen is back over 9 is, 91.20. euro/dollar pulling back from its year high, down to back below 1.47, 1.4667. sterling/dollar was around 1.65, today is .63. >> here in asia kra, ross, after that massive rally we saw yesterday, we are seeing share prices here pulling back a little bit. china is one of the biggest losers today by more than 3%. we had some numbers out sales the u.s. may impose more tariffs on chinese steel products.
different kind of system could be used to protect u.s. forces in europe as well as allies. there is tremendous russian opposition to this and criticism from republicans, specifically from john kyl, that we have backed down in the face of russia, but most believe that this has to do with iran. bill: likely to be one of the first questions asked to robert gates when he briefed the pentagon, as well as robert gibbs. we will be keeping an eye on those. thank you. megyn: first, some top democrats accused those who opposed this health care reform bill as nazis. ;úñno carrierringconnect 1200 ç>>çrje towards president barack obama is based on the fact that he is a black man.+ ç>> i am not sure that i see ts march and national conversation going on. i am simply saying i do notç kw if the president agreesç with that. megyn: do the american people agree with former president carter? former -- latest numbersç from rasmussen poll suggests, o' just 0% believe that those who oppose reform are racist. çç67% say that he is from. 21% say they are not sure. ççscott ras
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defense system i eastern europe. and nato sugges its linking it missile defenses wi russia's >>> new anti-gernment protests inran and new harsh words from president ahmadinejad, w continues to dy the holocaust. >>> we'll ke you to france where asylum seekersrom iraq and afghanistan endure salid conditio in hopes of finding a better life. >>> and we will visit israel and show you what being touted as the latest prescription for od health. salt therapy. >>> om the world's leading reporters and alysts, here's what's happening from arnd the world. this is "worldfocus." madeossible in part by the followinfunders -- mar support has also been ovided by the peter g. peterson foundation, dicated to promoti fiscal responsibity and addressing y economic challenges facing america's future >>good evening. i'm daljithaliwal. m daljit dhaliwal. tonight we're going to foc on america's retions with russia and iran -- ter that important cision yesterday by presiden obama not to basa missile defenssystem in the foer soviet-bloc untries of poland and the czecrepublic. russia vwed the shield as a threat, d to
where the game isn't finished. we have serious regulations, which we enforce. let me -- >> stop europe creating jobs in the biggest boom of modern history. a million more jobs in europe then. >> let me finish. >> we expect compliance and so should you. we're actually on the same side of this one. >> we're really not. i think there's nothing wrong with having intel with 85% of the chip market. if they earn it. >> not for having 85%, but for manipulating the market. which is a completely different thing. >> i feel like europe is jealous of the united states of america because we are the most innovative, dynamic economy in the world and even after you got together with the european union you don't come close. set me right, sir. >> we come fairly close. what have you innovated in the last 30 years? >> what car do you dry or more of your people drive? >> japanese. >> they're more efficient, more kwfrtable, more reliable. by'm not saying america is not innovative. we enormously admire the innovative spirit. >> yok you admire american businesses at all. i think you want to put them out of bus
on how things are going in europe in terms of the controversy over potential policies to deal with global warming. in your position as president of the european union, you have been standing against the attempt to do more capt. trade. that is a very good thing for you to do. can you just catch us up with things are? >> i think it is wrong to concentrate or to narrow the discussion on capt. trade. as i said, the difference is that we accept crazy doctrine of global warming. we look at collins of instruments to use. that is another issue. that is just an instrument. for me, it is irrelevant. i am afraid that there is the that. the other side doesn't listen. tran gadahn participate in the discussion. i have one frustrating experience after another. we go from here and have the climate change conference. governments participate and i have the pleasure of sitting at the same table. i am afraid that there is no serious discussion. nevertheless, i published a book i was in slovenia where the book was also published. this is the 11th language published. the launching ceremony had the president co
all beat expectations in august. >> hello, everybody. i'm louisa bojesen. in europe, magna says it has plans to deal with the central conflict of interest at the carmaker. >> and i'm brian shactman in the u.s. the question is, who is the man behind the mac? major changes ahead for one of the top wall street banks. >> hello, everybody. welcome. you are watching cnbc's "worldwide exchange." we're very pleased that you're with us on this friday and we'll kick off our market run with a global look at the ftse cnbc global 300 index indicating that we've seen a little bit of buying here initially at the get-go on european trade. if we show you our european markets, you'll see the telling has been rather broad based. we're tracking strong gains that we've seen in wall street, incidentally. the strongest run of gains that we've had over the past five days for wall street that we've had since november of last year. investors snapping up banks, like lloyd's, commerzbank being bought up this morning and all the focus is on commodities on the back of copper higher by 1.5%, gold is higher, oil trad
people more or less being without a job both stateside as well as in europe and many places. >> i think what we have to focus is those that are fortunate enough to have jobs, they have built up higher savings, especially in the u.s. and europe and the uk. so we think that once they feel comfortable that the employment situation has stabilized, then i think that they will go out and spend or use up some of those savings and spend. so we think that that will -- that, coupled with the fact that inventories at the retail and many factory levels have been run down quite substantially over the last six to 12 months. so that inventories would have to be rebuilt. and if that comes about with a little bit more spending by those who actually did have a job, then that will mean that the recovery will be able to -- to show some growth. and so i think that that is what the markets are pricing in right now. >> kim, this is mike huckman in the states. but you make it sound kind of like consumer spending is going to rebound when we have the likes of joseph stiglett saying that the risk of a double dip,
and eastern europe, but all over the world. thank you for organizing this conference. i have been in this room before and i am always very pleased to be here. it is not by chance that this conference is organized by the cato institute. on the side of the alaska, cato has been one of the most important institutions devoted to depending and promoting individual liberty, limited government and free markets. i learned a lot from qaeda. when communism collapsed and we were finally free to travel to the western world, we found many friends here. i remember my first meeting and many of their collaborators not long after the revolution. as i mentioned, i was pleased that kato published a book, the rebirth of liberty more than 10 years ago as a side remark, i saw that the book is sold their. it is irrelevant. i discovered that it sold elsewhere. it really demonstrates that. it is good to know. it may be surprising for some of you, but the fall of communism remains to be a rather controversial topic, at least in our part of the world. there are several competing interpretations. both the fall of communi
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